Kudos Galore II

Filed under: Family Updates — Chamberlain @ 10:19 pm
No. 139

More Hat Tips to Clansmen!



Here’s the latest from George Judy on his promotion to lead the Commercial Truck Division for Enterprise Rent-a-Car in Milwaukee WI.

“We sold our house in Neenah after living there for almost 7 years and expect to close on our new house in Whitefish Bay by the end of July. We have had a longing to be back in the city for sometime now (culture, things to do, diversity, etc.) so we are very excited to be here. Whitefish Bay is just a few miles north of downtown Milwaukee and is just a few blocks from Lake Michigan, It’s got great parks on the lake, a small downtown area within walking distance and a great public school system.

I’ve been working in Milwaukee for the past couple of months and I’m heading up our Commercial Truck division (Group Truck Manager). Enterprise opened Commercial Truck about 10 years ago. We have only been opened in Wisconsin for about 4 years and so we are a small operation in a very established and competitive market. My job is to change that and expand our operations throughout Wisconsin. July 15th will mark my 15 year anniversary with Enterprise. It’s hard to believe it’s been that long.

We are heading up to our place on Washington Island today and are very excited to have a whole week of vacation up there. It’s been a hectic few months so we are more than ready for the trip…

Love,
George III, Lucy, Magnolia (3 1/2), and George IV (15 months)”

 


 



Featured on the cover of the 24th of May issue of America Magazine (shown above) is an article by our Peter J Smith MD. Pete is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Chicago, specializing in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, and is Director of the Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Fellowship Program there. He is actively involved in both lay and physician education regarding developmental disabilities. His article is part of this effort, focusing on the need for Catholic Parishes to have a better understanding of and more inclusive attitude towards their disabled parishioners

“Much progress has been made in the area of language. Today, parishioners typically understand that many formerly acceptable terms (crippled, Mongoloid, handicapped, even “the disabled”) are no longer acceptable. It is better to use precise and accurate terms like a “child with cerebral palsy” or to speak of a “person with a disability,” which communicates that one sees the person first and the disability second…”

 


 

It’s impressive to see careers such as these underway… LC

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